The end of a perfect day in Oban
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  GOOD THINGS TO SEE AND DO IN OBAN
DUNSTAFFNAGE CASTLE, near DUNBEG
This castle sits in Dunstaffnage Bay, about three miles north of Oban. It is an Historic Scotland property, and was built long long ago. It is a castle that was apparently captured by Robert the Bruce in 1309, and was also the temporary prison of Flora MacDonald in 1746. In addition, there is an ancient chapel nearby. Spectacular views around the bay, and very much worth a look. See Soup page for nearby source of soup (Poppies Garden Centre).
A FERRY TO THE ISLAND OF KERRERA
Ferries arrive and depart from Oban all the time. Indeed, the town is regarded as the 'Charing Cross of the Highlands', a place you would make for when your ultimate destination is Mull or Colonsay or Iona or other islands. You can, as a nice day out, take a ferry to the Island of Kerrera. It's a short voyage that leaves from a jetty just two miles south of Oban, along the coast (which is, now that I think about it, quite logical as you're highly unlikely to get a ferry from, say, a field or the side of a mountain). As you may see from your map, Kerrera has lots of exciting things, like a castle, caves, loads of pretty walks, and scenery that will bring tears of wonder to your eyes. With your map at hand (as mentioned above) you are guaranteed a day that you will never ever forget. (CAUTION - facilities may be limited on the island during the months of winter.)
A LITTLE CYCLE
If you have your map (as detailed above) then you will see there is loads of opportunity to cycle and cycle. You could, for example, cycle a few miles north from Oban on the A85(T) and turn into Dunstaffnage Bay to admire their castle. A larger cycle route could take you on the minor road leading east from Oban, through Glen Lonan, to Taynuilt. The choice is entirely yours. If you don't have your own bicycle, you can hire one from RCS Cycles in Taynuilt, and for a small charge they can even deliver and collect your cycle from Oban. Now that's service! Give them a call on 01866 822736 or 07791 974152.
A SLIGHTLY BIGGER WALK - OBAN TO CONNEL
Got your map? You'll need the Ordnance Survey Landranger Sheet 49, Oban & East Mull, 1:50000 scale or one-and-a-quarter inches to a mile. It's a walk of some five miles, most of it on a track that runs close to the railway line. At the Oban end it starts off on a yellow minor road that passes a golf course (see the CH and the flag on your map - 'CH' stands for club house) and nears the railway line at Glen Cruitten where it soon becomes a track. Connel itself is a very pleasant scenic place, and worth a good long peep. (CAUTION - watch out for cars when you hit the busy road near Connel.)
A LITTLE WALK - UP TO McCAIG'S FOLLY
McCaig's Folly is that glorious circular structure that you see above the town, and which features on most postcards concerned with Oban. When first built, long long ago, it was intended to be a view-tower, museum and art gallery, but clearly someone made a bit of a boob and forgot that for buildings to be complete they need such essential structural additions as floors, ceilings, windows and what have you. So now it sits above the town, a permanent and clearly iconic reminder of unfinished business. The short, but steep, walk up to the folly, or tower, will offer outstanding views across the waters of Oban Bay, and should not be missed.
OBAN WAR & PEACE MUSEUM, CORRAN ESPLANADE
Museums are generally run by dusty musty fousty gremlins with big ears, and this one, I'm sure, is no exception. It's quite a new museum, all bright and shiny, and the Head Gremlin works away behind the scenes when it is closed by encouraging his collection of hairy spiders to coat every available surface in cobwebs. So, if it's closed when you get there - which is in fact quite a lot of the time: December, January and February - you'll at least know that work is going on behind the scenes to, at the very least, reduce the glare.
OBAN CHOCOLATE FACTORY, 34 CORRAN ESPLANADE
Now, chocolate is very different from whisky. For one, it is not made by large-nosed dwarves. It is, of course, made by pixies, who cultivate secret fields full of special chocolate-nectar flowers. In here, you can watch the Head Pixie at work making chocolate, and taste some yummy stuff. Closed in January. (Write to the Head Pixie to complain.)
OBAN DISTILLERY, STAFFORD STREET
Whereas real ale is generally brewed by the elves, whisky in Scotland has traditionally been distilled by large-nosed dwarves. They have been found to be very good at it as the large warty proboscis allows them to finely tune the spirit during the distillation process and permit only the most desirable portions of alcohol to be used. What... you didn't know dwarves were involved? Goodness. Ask them at the Oban Distillery; they will confirm this, tell you a little about it all, and maybe even lubricate your tonsils with the dwarves' secret and very special potion. Closed in January. (Write to The Master Large-Nosed Dwarf to complain.)
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OS Landranger sheet 49 map is available in our shop