The Palace, Culross
Other Stuff
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  GOOD THINGS TO SEE AND DO IN CULROSS
THE PALACE
Both the interior and exterior of this grand building are little changed since it was built long ago (late 16th century, perhaps). The overwhelming impression one gets on approaching it is the colour orange. For like a number of buildings in the village, beneath the orange pantiles its walls have been restored to their original colour, and visitors could be forgiven for thinking that they were witnessing the results of someone running amok with a tin of orange paint. But it is nevertheless a happy colour. It is the colour of a large dolls house. Inside there are old painted wooden ceilings, squeaky floorboards, and doorways where you may save some haircut money by forgetting to duck. Excellent sloping garden at the rear, with great views of Culross and over the Forth.
THE TOWN HOUSE
A gem of a structure festooned with stuff, most of it very old. Not sure about opening hours - may be guided tours from the Palace in Culross.
THE STUDY
An old whitewashed house with a curious poky wee room at the top of a narrow winding set of stairs. Access via guided tours from the Palace.
THE ABBEY
Up a steep narrow lane and mostly in ruins, but don't let that put you off. I actually like looking at ruins. You could point me towards a small wall, tell me its history, and I'd be more than happy, so to have the added bonus of a few window and door frames is a real treat. The abbey church is still in use, and contains a fascinating tomb in the Bruce Aisle. It is the tomb of George Bruce of Carnock, along with 'his lady, his three sons and five daughters.' Marble statues of the sons and daughters are arranged around the base of their parents' prone and utterly lifeless stone bodies, each on their knees and missing some vital part of their anatomy, like a hand or two. There has clearly been some vandalism in the past. A link exists between the family and the Elgin Marbles.
A LITTLE WALK - THE PLAGUE GRAVE
Culross has a good variety of footpaths in and around it. The map you need to carry is the Ordnance Survey Landranger series sheet 65, 'Falkirk & Linlithgow', 1:50000 scale or one-and-a-quarter inches to a mile. You can also buy a booklet on the path network around Culross from a gallery by the mercat cross. I have marked the location of the Plague Grave with a round red dot and cross on the Fife Coastal Path map that covers the Culross area - the link to it is below. As you may see, it is right beside a footpath. The stile leading over the fence to the grave was broken at my last visit, but that doesn't matter as the grave can no longer be seen so there is no reason to cross the fence. At the spot is an information panel. Culross Moor was used for the burial of plague victims back in the seventeenth century and before. This site is where James Bald's three children were buried in 1645.
A BIG WALK - THE FIFE COASTAL PATH
Culross is on the Fife Coastal Path, and you can pick up the path by the shore. The Fife Coastal Path is a long-distance walking route that hugs the coast between nearby Kincardine and Newburgh. From Culross, for example, you could follow it for around four miles west to Kincardine. The path in this section runs between the road and the rail line by the shore. [CLICK HERE FOR A SPECIAL FIFE COASTAL PATH PAGE WITH INTERACTIVE MAP AND ROUTE.]
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The Town House, Culross
The Study, Culross
The Abbey, Culross
The Plague Grave information sign at Culross
map